three copic/ prisma marker pictures I did for christmas gifts.

kristaferanka:

ALL-NEW X-FACTOR #3PETER DAVID (W) • CARMINE DI GIANDOMENICO (A)Cover by KRIS ANKA & JARED FLETCHERVariant Cover by TBD"Not Brand X"• The All-New X-Factor is meant to help people…• But one of their own has a secret.• Hint: It’s Gambit.

that cat is just so damn happy.

kristaferanka:

ALL-NEW X-FACTOR #3
PETER DAVID (W) • CARMINE DI GIANDOMENICO (A)
Cover by KRIS ANKA & JARED FLETCHER
Variant Cover by TBD
"Not Brand X"
• The All-New X-Factor is meant to help people…
• But one of their own has a secret.
• Hint: It’s Gambit.

that cat is just so damn happy.

asker

Anonymous asked: "Repair Her Armor was created to show that female armor (specifically) are being sexualized on daily basis, instead of being portrayed as actual characters; they are treated as objects to gaze at - with pretty much nothing more to them. As a joke, someone created Repair His Armor and it was funny because they do not have the same issue when it comes to character design." You are doing exactly what you are saying happens when female characters are sexualized. You see only how they look.

ria-rha:

Hello, anon! Please tell me that you’re kidding me. If that’s what you got from reading the text, I’m afraid you got it all wrong.

As a woman who has played games since my childhood years, been watching loads of movies and cartoons, reading a bunch of comics - I always looked up to the female characters because of how great they were. I loved Storm (1990’s Xmen cartoon) because of her complete and utter badassery, I loved Hermione (Harry Potter) because of her sassiness and wisdom and I loved reading about the girls in the W.I.T.C.H comics.

Notice how they all got great designs.

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As I grew older, I went to the internet - I found fanart of them. However, it was not fanart of how I had grown to learn the characters. No, I saw them undressed, posing as pin-ups, with massive boobs and faces like blow-up dolls. While I found this bizarre and odd — I still thought - hey, I still know what great characters they really are. That is, until I noticed that games, comics, shows, movies, and everything in between, was exactly the same — minus the personality and reasoning. It seems like the older I got, the more I noticed that I, as a female, was not welcome in the media world. Literally.

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And for no good reason, either. For example, Wartune that is famous for their “male gamers only”-ad, the game actually look like this.

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All they thought of was how much boobs and ass can we show - and therefore sell - while completely ignoring the character’s personality - reasoning - and setting? Why was this? Why did I feel so uncomfortable looking at this? I had grown up to learn that you can dress however you want and that you should never judge anyone based on that. Fine, really, I don’t. But I don’t see the characters dressing like this. I see the character designers MAKING them like this so they can have something to FAP to. They’re literally selling women’s bodies because they think showing their skin will sell - which is complete and utter bullshit. A cheap way to sell media — completely ignoring the rest of the population - the girls and women. Why did we not matter what WE thought about it? I don’t mind a sexy character — as long as it’s not the only option. I don’t mind a half-naked character — as long as it fits the setting. I don’t mind any of that — as long as it makes sense, as long as it’s good. RHA is to prove that you can be fully dressed and/or fit the setting a lot better instead of being disrespectful and view women as objects.

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I’m one of those who like Jack from Mass Effect. While I find that top ridiculous (no really, how does it stay on? Make her go completely topless or give her a sports bra, for heaven’s sake). I feel like Jack is done well because it fits her. It fits her personality, her backstory, her setting - and she isn’t posed or modelled for you to fap to her. What came into my mind when seeing her was; “Huh, why is she dressed like that?” instead of “Ugh, really, not again….” cause let’s face it, the last game (especially) did a lot of odd things — like giving robots cameltoes. Yeah. 

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Jack, unlike so many other women in media, is posed off as someone we want to get to learn; someone we’d like to be. That is great. Ino from Guilty Gear is sexual, but it fits her. 

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She’s sexy, badass, and does what the heck she wants - it’s just great. She has a thought-through design. 

Take note that this is my opinion. When I play a MMORPG I want to be treated as a badass character as well. Or, at least give me an option to choose. A few games has actually started with this - such as the Final Fantasy mmorpg - when they make a girl run around in a bikini armor - well, expect the men to do that as well. Blade & Soul (sort of) lets you choose whatever you want to wear - so you’re not forced to wear an ass-showing outfit if you don’t want to (if now they only could let the men have a few more “sexy” outfits to choose between as well)… and a  few others. Media is slowly making progress. 

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Let’s take Gloria, for example. What purpose did she really have besides showing that she’s sexy? WHY did they have to do a slow-motion scene when she fights to show that she’s wearing no panties? (Spoiler: The “fight scene” where she spreads her legs and moan was completely unnecessary. Later on we figure out that she’s a spy that later turns out to be Trisha. That’s all it is. She was ONLY there in that scene so a horny straight guy could think; “HAWT!”. While we girls just sat there and felt… uncomfortable.)

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DMC is not alone on this. New games are still doing it. Too. Damn. Often.

So no. I don’t “only see how they look” — I just take notice on how they’re being represented. And as for now, they’re not being represented fairly at all. The day we finally more female characters treated with respect and care I will be happy. The day I see them being represented more than just a sexy babe with skin showing everywhere, I’ll be happy. The day I can see a female character show skin without being sexualized, I’ll be happy. I’m not trying to ban “sexy”. I’m not slut shaming. I’m not saying the characters should stop dressing like that — the characters did not choose it! I want them to stop sexualizing female bodies and stop trying to sell it. Give us proper designs, not a sexy bikini that we have seen before. It’s boring. I literally see see the same designs recycled all over again - just because they need to show as much skin as possible. So not only is it disrespectful - but it’s BORING.

Want to show their skin? DO it. But don’t do it because you want to sell them. Don’t do it  because their only purpose is to be sexy. Don’t do it because she’s the only female in the entire game/show/comic/whatever. Don’t do it ONLY because she’s the female lead - as rare as it is. They should be MORE than JUST sexy. Why bother making them run around in sexy lingerie when you can simply just make them naked?  Not like Scarlet Blade. Not like a sex toy. Like a woman. Like a character. And treat it with EQUALITY. Have a man run around naked too! If you really want to make sexy outfits - make sexy outfits for men too.

Also, really. Isn’t it stupid when you see this?

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Instead of this?

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Doesn’t first one say “Hi! Stab me here!”? Unless are equally silly, I will not buy it.

- Tica

shoomlah:

danipanteez asked:

Hi Claire! Thanks so much for helping out! I’ve attached the sketch.

So, for some clarification on what’s going on in the scene. It’s very slightly inspired by an old fairy tale about broken porcelain dolls. In the picture I wanted the story to be this girl is holding one of the dolls from the hutch behind her, but the man who owns them has just entered the room, and she looks up at him. Want him to be casting a shadow on about half the comp. (Which you can faintly see in the sketch.)

The thing is. I wanted this picture to be a super drastic angle and really push three point perspective. But I’m having trouble doing so and without it looking too weird. haha! Especially the girl. I keep trying to bring the horizon line down to about her knees. But somehow it just keeps going back to where it was everytime I redraw it. And last but not least, I even tried taking some reference photos and I still can’t quite capture the the angle and perspective I want.

That was a mouthful. My apologies for the novel! So my questions to you would be, do you have any advice in exaggerating an angle that we can’t quite get in real life? Any ideas as to how I can better capture this correctly. And for composition. i still feel it’s a bit weak since I made it a head-on shot. I thought of making the corner of the room visible and so her back is not against the hutch, if that makes sense. But then i worry it might take away from the story I want it to tell? And if i can even pull that off. haha. okay! I’m done now! So sorry for being so wordy!

You can feel free to make a post about it on tumblr, as others can always benefit from a critique! But if you just reply here, I don’t mind either. :) Thanks so much love!

So you found me out, I’m actually a total perspective junkie!  I don’t use it a ton in my own work, weirdly enough, but drawing things in perspective is one of my secret artsy happy places.  This stuff is like candy. :)

So first things first, composition aside, you do have a nice handle on perspective- while the composition can definitely use some tweaking, there’s definitely nothing innately wrong about your sketch!  It’s just a matter of shaking up the camera angle a little bit and being less tied to that idea of “placing the horizon line.”

If you look at your current composition, it’s actually (almost!) a vertical 2-point perspective- if you rotate the image 90 degrees you’ll notice that one of the perspective planes is straight-on!  Totally valid composition, but it also lacks the dynamism/imbalance that’s usually associated with full-on three-point perspective:

(Quick aside- props to you for taking the time to design/draw an actual clutch!  I feel like a lot of people phone it in when they’re drawing environments, so the specificity and details you’re hinting at are really compelling.  Makes the clutch a character in its own right.)

—-

Let’s talk about designing three-point perspective in a small space.

So I find it immensely weird that a lot of perspective surveys stop at three-point perspective, or at least don’t touch on the fact that, once you bring the horizon into play, you have to take into account the fourth perspective point as objects start to diminish in the other direction.  If you don’t, things look less like proper perspective and more like actual shape distortion:

…I’m not gonna go too deep into this right now but, suffice to say for our immediate purposes, forget the horizon line.  Throw it out the window.  INTO THE HORIZON you might say, hohohohoho.

In a (confined) indoor space, it takes tilting your head/camera pretty damn dramatically to get the vertical lines of a room to diminish á la three-point perspective.  Because of this, you probably aren’t going to be able to see the horizon line from that camera angle- you’re either staring at the floor or the ceiling, so the horizon line becomes less of a tool and more of a crutch that’s limiting your options.  That dude’s such an asshole.

So to make your life easier, worry less about horizon lines, and more about your individual vanishing points.  When you’re thumbnailing, a great way to solidify your perspective (or come up with new ideas, honestly), is to do this:

If you want to push a vanishing point even further away you can just enlarge the pinwheel!  pretty cut and dry.

 —-

Using compositional hierarchy to reflect narrative.

So now that we’ve covered the actual mechanics of three-point perspective, let’s talk about how to make it work for the story you’re trying to tell.


Option no. 1:
(see above) My first instinct would be to consider shifting the camera angle so it’s looking down on her, as opposed to the other way around.  It puts us, the viewer, in (or near) the position of the figure in the doorway, and has the added benefit of making her smaller and more vulnerable in the composition- it visually traps her in the space of the room by showing the surrounding walls.

Option no. 1b: never overestimate the value of tilting/canting a composition for a quick Dutch angle!  Kinda cheating if you use it too much, but WHAM POW instant drama.

Option no. 2: There are an infinite number of variations on this idea- a sharper angle, cropping in closer on her, etc.- so my solution is by no means the PERFECT BEST COMPOSITION EVER, but it gives you some idea of a different direction you could take with this piece while maintaining your sense of drama/tension.

Option no. 3: Aaaaand of course, as I defiantly drew the previous angles, I started thinking about how it could work from her perspective, kinda closer to your original piece.  I do agree with your concerns about a straightforward, “head-on” composition, so I’d imagine at that point you’d have to show the figure silhouetted in the door- your main character would be reacting either to his shadow, or turning to face him.

This methodology for finding narrative compositions is by no means an absolute rule of illustration, by the by- visually “choosing a side” is a great way to immediately interject some drama into an image, but it’s also entirely up to you!  You want to end up with something you’re happy with.

 —-

Being a “fly in the room.”
One of the best pieces of advice I got from one of my professors, Mary Jane-Begin, was to be a fly in the room.  We all tend to settle on certain camera angles, either out of convenience of experience,  so letting your mind wander and just sketching out some absurd alternatives can help you stumble across something unexpectedly cool. :)

So tl;dr, it feels like you know what you want out of this piece- these might not be the exact solutions for your tastes, but they might be enough of a push in the right direction that you don’t feel like you’re stalling anymore.  I hope all of this is helpful/relevant!

Best of luck, and I can’t wait to see the finished piece! CLAIRE OUT <3

Amazing perspective tutorial . Must try.

yesthisisaaron:

You know how some pro artists post ‘sketches’ that look like finished work and then you hate them but then they like your dolphin sketches and so you love them? Yeah.

(via meltingdoll)

hatboy:

Hey! You’re wonderful! I appreciate you!
Sometimes I get the feeling that I want to spontaneously compliment some of my favorite artists on Tumblr. Just an out-of-the-blue “I Appreciate You!”
I think it’s important for an artist to know that they’re appreciated. It’s often encouraging and shows supportiveness. Plus, it’s also always nice to spread a bit of positivity here and there.
God knows it brightens my day when you guys send me nice messages. I’m sorry for not replying. I’ve still got weird social anxieties. I’ll deal with it. But please just know, each kind message is greatly appreciated.
And besides, if I do answer your messages, they disappear from my inbox and I’ll never see them again. Haha!

hatboy:

Hey! You’re wonderful! I appreciate you!

Sometimes I get the feeling that I want to spontaneously compliment some of my favorite artists on Tumblr. Just an out-of-the-blue “I Appreciate You!”

I think it’s important for an artist to know that they’re appreciated. It’s often encouraging and shows supportiveness. Plus, it’s also always nice to spread a bit of positivity here and there.

God knows it brightens my day when you guys send me nice messages. I’m sorry for not replying. I’ve still got weird social anxieties. I’ll deal with it. But please just know, each kind message is greatly appreciated.

And besides, if I do answer your messages, they disappear from my inbox and I’ll never see them again. Haha!

Volty the pony belongs to Voltage-X

Volty the pony belongs to Voltage-X

shoomlah:

(high res)
New print for Steamcon V this weekend!  Plus some detail shots since it’s crazy long.

I’ve had this thing on the back burner for something like a year now (and I’ve had the Harley design for even longer) so it feels fantastic to see it to finish.  Hand-drawn typography always seems like such a good idea when you’re starting a piece!  And then…  Kerning.  Kerning for hours.

man, I love Shoomlah’s everything always.